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My Journey with Tony: Duncan Robinson: "Thirty Years as an Armchair Traveller"

My Journey With Tony: Duncan Robinson: "Thirty Years as an Armchair Traveller"





Please join us for tea and biscuits (cookies) and a talk by Duncan Robinson, former Director of the Yale Center for British Art, who first met Tony Foster as a younger artist in the U.K. 


Please note: The talk begins at 7:00 p.m.


5:00 - 6:30 p.m. - Museum closed for event set up


6:30 p.m. - Doors open


7:00 p.m. - Talk begins


8:30 p.m. - Museum closes


The My Journey with Tony Speaker Series features friends and colleagues of Tony Foster who have either accompanied him on his painting journeys or who have been influential in the evolution of The Foster.





About Duncan Robinson


Duncan Robinson is the former director of the Yale Center for British Art, a public art museum and research institute that houses the largest British art collection outside the U.K.


Robinson graduated from Clare College of Cambridge University, England. He attended Yale as a Mellon Fellow and received an M.A. in Art History. He studied art history at Cambridge under Sir John Pope-Hennessy, and served as a director at The Fitzwilliam Museum. In 1981 he was appointed Director of the Yale Center for British Art.





About Tony Foster


Born in Lincolnshire, England, artist-explorer Tony Foster finds inspiration in the wild places of the world, which he paints en plein air. Since 1982, he has undertaken a variety of watercolor “journeys”—painting projects based on a philosophical or environmental theme—that often involve multiple expeditions over many years. His subjects range from mountains, rivers, rainforests, deserts, coral reefs and Arctic icebergs to such iconic natural areas as the Grand Canyon and Mount Everest.


Hiking, rafting, kayaking or canoeing to find the perfect painting site, then camping outdoors for weeks at a time to make his paintings, Foster frequently faces challenging weather and difficult conditions. His paintings, complete with diary excerpts and “souvenirs,” document his experiences in wilderness and his commitment to its preservation.